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Feb. 11th, 2009 | 12:47 am

So, I've never really read any Roethke, except for "My Papa's Waltz", but today the lines from "The Swan" really just floored me for some reason; maybe it was caused by an unfettered love for the named poet, but I still think Roethke gets credit for these savage lines:

"I am my father's son, I am John Donne
Whenever I see her with nothing on"



Obviously, someone with the best of judgment has suggested Simon Armitage. Is there anyone else whose poetry I should read?

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Comments {10}

Something so wild turned into paper

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from: ann_septimus
date: Feb. 11th, 2009 03:03 pm (UTC)
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Simon Armitage, at Get Lit! in Spokane this April. Come!!!!

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Rachel

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from: ahbrightwings
date: Feb. 11th, 2009 07:08 pm (UTC)
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Roethke's "The Waking" is one of my favorite poems: http://gawow.com/roethke/poems/104.html

And I could go on and on about poetry you should read, but I don't really know what you WANT to read... have you read much James Wright?

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Samuel

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from: samchuck
date: Feb. 12th, 2009 12:06 am (UTC)
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I have not read James Wright, but I shall.

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Rachel

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from: ahbrightwings
date: Feb. 12th, 2009 12:16 am (UTC)
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Sentimental, perhaps, but "A Blessing" makes my heart explode: http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/16944

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winstonsbitch

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from: winstonsbitch
date: Feb. 11th, 2009 08:40 pm (UTC)
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OMFG. I love those lines too! I nearly put them on my facebook wall.

If you like Roethke, you should read Kunitz, who was a big influence on him... see also Robert Hass's "What Furies" from "20th Century Pleasures" which mentions their friendship.

Rachel is right also... people who like Roethke tend to like Wright too. As Revell snarkily remarked in a symbolist-bitch slap. (Fucking Black Mountain School.) He also had a heap of issues with Carolyn Forche, but I agreed with him on that one... over rated.

I don't know if you've read Berryman's 77 Dream Songs? You can get them in a complete "Dream Songs" edition which also includes "His Toy, His Dream, His Rest," but the 77 are his best known and I think the best. Mind-blowingly good.

You might have guessed you'd get a long answer from me, but I'd like to give a shout out to my bitch lover, Hart Crane. Everyone beats off about "Brooklyn Bridge" which is duh brilliant, but check out "Voyages." People tend to dislike him because he's "difficult" (in that the relationship between lines isn't always obvious) but I think you'd like him.

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Samuel

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from: samchuck
date: Feb. 12th, 2009 12:24 am (UTC)
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I almost texted you last night about those lines, but didn't know if you had a phone and then thought that it was probably too crazy.

Anyway, I obviously posted this on lj as a way to finagle a long answer from you, so I wouldn't have to figure stuff out on my own, because I am lazy.

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Eleanor

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from: eleanorgrace
date: Feb. 12th, 2009 08:06 am (UTC)
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Okay you fucking literary snobs, I will be the one to say the obvious and possibly unpopular one, since you all have to throw out non-household names. If you haven't read Eliot's Four Quartets, you will be thrilled to your toes by some of the lines in there (specifically in East Coker, aka number 2), though I'm not completely sure they're great poems overall.

And if you like Frost, which I doubt, you should check out Richard Wakefield.

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Rachel

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from: ahbrightwings
date: Feb. 12th, 2009 05:55 pm (UTC)
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Whatever dude, the only non-household name was Kunitz, in my opinion. CLEARLY you didn't take 20th Century Poetry from T-Marsh. MISTAKE.

Okay this comment makes me sound like an asshole. Sprinkle it with lighthearted dust?

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Samuel

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from: samchuck
date: Feb. 13th, 2009 03:31 am (UTC)
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I love Eliot, even though I think that's sort of an unfashionable opinion these days (Except I can't stand the lines in Prufrock "In the room the women come and go/Talking of Michaelangelo". Something about the line just doesn't fit with the tenor of the rest of the work for me.)

I don't dislike Frost especially. I often find his imagery too obvious, which then makes me too cognizant of his form, but I wouldn't say that of everything he's done. Is Richard Wakefield your relative?

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Eleanor

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from: eleanorgrace
date: Feb. 16th, 2009 03:55 am (UTC)
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(My dad, haha.)

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